Courses for Fall 2019

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
LALS 060-401 Latina/O Literature: Latina/O Literature: Latinx Cultural Studies Jennifer Sternad Ponce De Leon MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course offers a broad introduction to the study of Latina/o/x culture. We will examine literature, theater, visual art, and popular cultural forms, including murals, poster art, graffiti, guerrilla urban interventions, novels, poetry, short stories, and film. In each instance, we will study this work within its historical context and with close attention to the ways it illuminates class formation, racialization, and ideologies of gender and sexuality as they shape Latino/a/xs' experience in the U.S. Topics addressed in the course will include immigration and border policy, revolutionary nationalism and its critique, anti-imperialist thought, Latinx feminisms, queer latinidades, ideology, identity formation, and social movements. While we will address key texts, historical events, and intellectual currents from the late 19th century and early 20th century, the course will focus primarily on literature and art from the 1960s to the present. All texts will be in English. ENGL070401, COML070401, GSWS060401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
LALS 070-401 Colonial Latin America Marcy Norton MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM The year 1492 was pivotal in the history of the world. It precipitated huge population movements within the Americas and across the Atlantic - a majority of them involuntary as in the case of indigenous and African people who were kidnapped and enslaved. It led to cataclysmic cultural upheavals, including the formation of new cultures in spaces inhabited by people of African, European and indigenous descent. This course explores the processes of destruction and creation in the region known today as Latin America in the period 1400 - 1800. Class readings are primary sources and provide opportunities to learn methods of source analysis in contexts marked by radically asymmetrical power relationships. HIST070401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span>
LALS 072-401 Intro Lat Am & Latino St Ann C. Farnsworth-Alvear MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Latin American and Latino Studies, this is a seminar oriented toward first and second year students. Readings will range widely, from scholarly work on the colonial world that followed from and pushed back against the "conquest"; to literary and artistic explorations of Latin American identities; to social scientists' explorations of how Latinos are changing the United States in the current generation. HIST072401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2019C&course=LALS072401
LALS 174-401 Capitalism, Socialism, & Crisis in Twentieth-Century Americas Amy C. Offner TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM From the crisis of the Great Depression through the 1970s, the United States and Latin America produced remarkable efforts to remake society and political economy. This course analyzes the Cuban and Guatemalan revolutions, as well as social movements that transformed the United States: the black freedom movement, the labor movement, and changing forms of Latino politics. In all three countries, Americans looked for ways to reform capitalism or build socialism; address entrenched patterns of racism; define and realize democracy; and achieve national independence. They conceived of these challenges in dramatically different ways. Together, we'll compare national histories and analyze the relationships between national upheavals. In studying the US and Latin America together, the class allows students to explore central questions in both regions' histories. What did capitalism, socialism, and communism amount to? What did democracy mean? What were the roots of racial inequality and how did Americans address it? Why were Americans so enticed by economic growth, and how did they pursue it? How did the Cold War shape social movements? What purposes did unions serve? How did Christianity inform movements for and against social change? Studying these regions together also allows us to explore international interactions. How did the black freedom movement in the US relate to the Cuban revolution? How did Latin American immigration shape the US labor movement? How did US Cold War policy influence Latin American revolutionary movements? The goal of this class is for you to interpret the readings and decide what you think. What you learn in this class, and the quality of our experience together, depends on your reading closely, coming to class with informed ideas and questions, and being prepared to help your classmates answer theirs. We will read approximately 100 pages per week. No background is required. HIST174401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes) <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
LALS 175-401 History of Brazil Melissa Teixeira TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM With its booming economy, the recent inauguration of its first female president, and its selection as host to the 2012 World Cup and Olympic games, Brazil is growing in global prestige. But amid all these exciting developments are devastating socioeconomic inequalities. Access to safe living conditions, livable wages, higher education, and overall social mobility remain painfully out of reach to many Brazilians, the majority of whom are the descendants of slaves. Why do these problems persist in a country that has had such an enduring and widespread reputation as a "racial democracy"? What are the possibilities of closing the equality gap in Brazil? HIST175401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
LALS 233-401 Feminism in the Americas Ann C. Farnsworth-Alvear R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Topics vary HIST233401, GSWS233401, AFRC234401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2019C&course=LALS233401
LALS 233-402 Indigenous History of Mexico From the Aztecs To Present Marcy Norton W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Topics vary HIST233402
LALS 233-403 Piracy and the Law in the Atlantic World, 1560-1850 Casey Schmitt T 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Topics vary HIST233403
LALS 240-401 Contemp Brazilian Cinema Mercia S. Flannery TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Topics vary. For current course description, please see department's webpage: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc CIMS232401, PRTG240401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Literatures of the World</span>
LALS 248-401 Haitian Revolution Yvonne Fabella R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM HIST248401, AFRC248401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2019C&course=LALS248401
LALS 254-401 Archaeology of the Inca Clark Lowden Erickson TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM The Inca created a vast and powerful South American empire in the high Andes Mountains that was finally conquered by Spain. Using Penn's impressive Museum collections and other archaeological, linguistic, and historical sources, this course will examine Inca religion and worldview, architecture, sacred temples, the capital of Cuzco, ritual calendar, ceque system, textiles, metalworking, economic policies and expansionist politics from the dual perspectives of Inca rulers and their subjects. Our task is to explain the rise, dominance, and fall of the Incas as a major South American civilization. ANTH254401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes)
LALS 267-401 Latin American Art Mark A. Castro TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The numerous traditions of Latin American art have been formed from the historical confluence of Indigenous, European, African, and Asian cultural traditions, each one impacting the others. This course serves as an introduction to these hybrid New World art forms and movements by both providing a large chronological sweep (1492-present) and focusing on several specific countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Peru, and Argentina. ARTH267401, ARTH667401, LALS667401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
LALS 274-601 Facing America William D Schmenner W 05:30 PM-08:30 PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s. ARTH274601, CIMS293601, ASAM294601, ARTH674601, AFRC294601
LALS 317-401 The Politics of Matter Kristina M. Lyons M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM What is nature? What is culture? What kinds of practices and actors constitute what we call science? Who and what constitute the sphere we refer to as politics? A number of theoretical developments in cultural anthropology, political theory, critical geography, and feminist science studies have problematized the modernist ontological divide between Nature and Culture and a whole series of binary oppositions (such as objects/subjects, matter/form, bio/geo) that follow from it. Taking inspiration from this literature and placing it in conversation with Native and Indigenous scholarship and a series of contemporary socio-environmental struggles occurring in Latin America and beyond, this course will discuss the conceptual-methodological tools that a concern with politics of matter has generated. The epistemic and political implications of these tools go beyond their analytical usefulness as innovative devices to explore novel phenomena. They complicate well-established fields of inquiry, such as political ecology and economy, environmental studies, ethics, social justice, and modern politics; and, indeed, the singular ontology that these fields may inadvertently and explicitly sustain. We will explore how it is that things, stuff, matter, 'nature' came to fall outside modern politics as such, and the kinds of ethico-political repercussions that problematizing this division may produce. ANTH317401
LALS 328-401 Diplomacy in the Americas: the Penn Model Oas Program Catherine E.M. Bartch T 04:30 PM-06:00 PM
R 04:30 PM-06:00 PM
"Diplomacy in the Americas" an academically based community service course in which students work with Philadelphia and Norristown public school students to explore solutions to critical problems facing the Americas. Entrenched political, economic, and social inequality, combined with environmental degradation, weak institutions, pervasive health epidemics, weapon proliferation, and other issues pose formidable hurdles for strengthening democratic ideals and institutions. The Organization of the American States (OAS), the world's oldest regional organization, is uniquely poised to confront these challenges. "Diplomacy in the Americas" guides students through the process of writing policy resolutions as though the students were Organization of the American States (OAS) diplomats, basing their research and proposals on democracy, development, security, and human rights - the four pillars of the OAS. Students will also read literature about what it means to educate for a democracy and global citizenry, and they will have the opportunity to turn theory into practice by creating and executing curriculum to teach and mentor the high school students through interactive and experiential pedagogies. PSCI328401
LALS 387-401 Black Feminist Approaches To History and Memory Grace L. Sanders Johnson M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Topics vary: Black Feminist Approaches to History & Memory - The term black feminism emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of black feminism, however, are much older, easily reaching back to the work of black women abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century. The concept continued to grow and evolve in the work of twentieth century black women writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document black women's lives. Collectively, their work established black feminism as a political practice dedicated to the equality of all people. More recently, black feminism has been deployed as a tool for theoretical and scholarly analysis that is characterized by an understanding that race, class, gender, and sexuality are inextricably interconnected. AFRC387401, HIST387401, GSWS387401
LALS 394-401 The Secret Circle: Fictions of Conspiracy in Contemporary Lt Am Literature Oscar E. Montoya MWF 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Topics vary. See the Romance Languages Department's website at http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml for a description of the current offerings. SPAN394401
LALS 394-402 The Boom in Spanish-American Literature Jean O'Bryan Knight MWF 01:00 PM-02:00 PM Topics vary. See the Romance Languages Department's website at http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml for a description of the current offerings. SPAN394402
LALS 396-401 Animals and Animality in Latin American Literature Ashley Roome Brock TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN390401
LALS 397-401 Studies in Span Am Cltr TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN396401
LALS 397-402 Studies in Span Am Cltr TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN396402
LALS 398-401 What Is Mexico? Questioning Mexican Icons Jorge Tellez TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN397401
LALS 398-402 Literature and Dictatorship in Latin American Literature Ashley Roome Brock TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN397402
LALS 424-401 Latinx Communities and the Role of Cbo's in Social Change Johnny Irizarry T 05:30 PM-08:30 PM The purpose of this course to create a Latino Studies/Service Learning ABCS course that cultivates dialogue and knowledge about the social, political, cultural and historical complexities of the Latinx experience in the United States (Philadelphia in particular) and the roles Latinx CBO's play in meeting the needs of Latinx communities and in impacting social change. SOCI424401
LALS 437-401 Love, Anger, Madness: History and Silences in Modern Haiti Grace L. Sanders Johnson M 09:00 AM-12:00 PM AFRC436401, HIST436401, GSWS436401
LALS 511-401 Ethics, Archaeology & Cultural Heritage Richard M. Leventhal T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This seminar will explore some of the most important issues that are now a central part of archaeological, anthropological and historical research throughout the world. The identification and control of cultural heritage is a central part of the framework for research within other communities. Issues for this course will also include cultural identity, human rights, repatriation, colonialism, working with communities and many other topics. Field research today must be based upon a new series of ethical standards that will be discussed and examined within this class. Major topics include: cultural heritage - definitions and constructs, cosmopolitanism and collecting, archaeology and looting, cultural heritage preservation, museums - universal and national, museum acquisition policies, cultural identity, international conventions (including underwater issues), national laws of ownership, community based development, cultural tourism, development models, and human rights. ANTH511401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span>
LALS 528-640 Latinxs and the Law Catherine E.M. Bartch T 06:00 PM-09:00 PM Based in concepts and principles of Constitutional law and critical race theory, this course explores the interpretation and impact of seminal court cases in U.S. history as applied to Latinxs in the United States and abroad. With a particular focus on the 20th century, students will examine how court decisions have affected civil rights, immigration policies, welfare, political incorporation, education, and other important issues affecting Latinxs. Students will also explore additional themes including the status and treatment of Latinxs in the criminal justice system, representation of Latinxs in the judiciary and how Supreme Court decisions have affected U.S. foreign policy with Latin America.
LALS 667-401 Latin American Art Mark A. Castro TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The numerous traditions of Latin American art have been formed from the historical confluence of Indigenous, European, African, and Asian cultural traditions, each one impacting the others. This course serves as an introduction to these hybrid New World art forms and movements by both providing a large chronological sweep (1492-present) and focusing on several specific countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Peru, and Argentina. ARTH267401, ARTH667401, LALS267401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
LALS 697-401 Latin American Marxisms Ericka Beckman CANCELED Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN697401