Courses for Fall 2018

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
LALS 070-401 Colonial Latin America Marcy Norton MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This course provides an introduction to the broad literature on Latin America's rich colonial history. We will begin by tracing some of the early originas of - and points of contact between - the Indian, Iberian, and Africa men and women who formed the basis of colonial society. As the course progresses, we will explore the variety of ways in which colonial subjects lived, worked, ate, worshipped, and socialized. Lectures and reading assignments will draw upon a variety of sources, including court cases, artistic renderings, city maps and street plans, travel accounts of visits to the regions, and the material, cultural, and intellectual products made possible by the wealth and dynamism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Age of Revolutions, a period of dramatic upheaval that remains at the center of lively scholarly debates. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage the key questions driving these debates, the most important of which, perhaps, is: what is Latin America's colonial legacy? HIST070401 H <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span>
LALS 072-401 Intro Lat Am & Latino St Ann C. Farnsworth-Alvear TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM Designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Latin American and Latino Studies, this is a seminar oriented toward first and second year students. Readings will range widely, from scholarly work on the colonial world that followed from and pushed back against the "conquest"; to literary and artistic explorations of Latin American identities; to social scientists' explorations of how Latinos are changing the United States in the current generation. HIST072401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
LALS 107-401 Coca and Cocaine Ann C. Farnsworth-Alvear R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Freshmen seminars are small, substantive courses taught by members of the faculty and open only to freshmen. These seminars offer an excellent opportunity to explore areas not represented in high school curricula and to establish relationships with faculty members around areas of mutual interest. See www.college.upenn.edu/admissions/freshmen.php HIST106401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Freshman Seminar</span>
LALS 174-401 Capitalism, Socialism, & Crisis in Twentieth-Century Americas Amy C. Offner TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The United States and Latin America produced a remarkable series of revolutions and reforms during the twentieth century. This course examines efforts throughout the hemisphere to define and address problems around land, labor, and property; nation, empire, and autonomy; and racism, democracy, and citizenship. It considers the relationship between national upheavals, the global consequences of events in the hemisphere, and the relation between social and political history, on the one hand, and the development of economic ideas, on the other. HIST174401, AFRC174401 H <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
LALS 175-401 History of Brazil TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM With its booming economy, the recent inauguration of its first female president, and its selection as host to the 2012 World Cup and Olympic games, Brazil is growing in global prestige. But amid all these exciting developments are devastating socioeconomic inequalities. Access to safe living conditions, livable wages, higher education, and overall social mobility remain painfully out of reach to many Brazilians, the majority of whom are the descendants of slaves. Why do these problems persist in a country that has had such an enduring and widespread reputation as a "racial democracy"? What are the possibilities of closing the equality gap in Brazil? HIST175401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2018C&course=LALS175401
LALS 209-601 Latino/As and the Law Catherine E.M. Bartch M 05:30 PM-08:30 PM Based in concepts and principles of Constitutional law, this course explores the interpretation and impact of seminal court cases in U.S. history as applied to Latino/as in the United States and abroad. With a particular focus on the 20th century, students will examine how court decisions have affected civil rights, immigration policies, welfare, political incorporation and identity and other important issues affecting Latino/as. Students will also explore additional themes including the status and treatment of Latinos in the criminal justice system, representation of Latino/as in the judiciary, and how Supreme Court decisions have also affected U.S. foreign policy with Latin America. Students will be introduced to a number of guest speakers who are academic experts and practioners in the field.
LALS 233-402 Colonial Spanish Borderlands, From the Floridas To the Californias Nancy O Gallman R 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Topics vary HIST233402 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2018C&course=LALS233402
LALS 235-401 Latinos in United States Emilio Alberto Parrado M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course presents a broad overview of the Latino population in the United States that focuses on the economic and sociological aspects of Latino immigration and assimilation. Topics to be covered include: construction of Latino identity, the history of U.S. Latino immigration, Latino family patterns and household structure, Latino educational attainment. Latino incorporation into the U.S. labor force, earnings and economic well-being among Latino-origin groups, assimilation and the second generation. The course will stress the importance of understanding Latinos within the overall system of race and ethnic relations in the U.S., as well as in comparison with previous immigration flows, particularly from Europe. We will pay particular attention to the economic impact of Latio immigration on both the U.S. receiving and Latin American sending communities, and the efficacy and future possililities of U.S. immigration policy. Within all of these diverse topics, we will stress the heterogeneity of the Latino population according to national origin groups (i.e. Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Latinos), as well as generational differences between immigrants and the native born. SOCI266401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">An Academically Based Community Serv Course</span>
LALS 240-401 Contemp Brazilian Cinema TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Topics vary. For current course description, please see department's webpage: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc CIMS232401, PRTG240401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Literatures of the World</span>
LALS 248-401 Haitian Revolution Yvonne Fabella W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM AFRC248401, HIST248401
LALS 267-401 Latin American Art David Young Kim
Gwendolyn D Shaw
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The numerous traditions of Latin American art have been formed from the historical confluence of Indigenous, European, African, and Asian cultural traditions, each one impacting the others. This course serves as an introduction to these hybrid New World art forms and movements by both providing a large chronological sweep (1492-present) and focusing on several specific countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Peru, and Argentina. ARTH267401, ARTH667401, LALS667401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2018C&course=LALS267401
LALS 328-401 Democracy in Trouble: Oas To the Rescue? Catherine E.M. Bartch T 04:30 PM-06:00 PM
R 04:30 PM-06:00 PM
PSCI328401
LALS 387-401 Blk Feminist Approaches: Black Feminist Approaches To History and Memory Grace L. Sanders Johnson CANCELED Topics vary: Black Feminist Approaches to History & Memory - The term black feminism emerged in public discourse amid the social, political, and cultural turbulence of the 1960s. The roots of black feminism, however, are much older, easily reaching back to the work of black women abolitionists and social critics of the nineteenth century. The concept continued to grow and evolve in the work of twentieth century black women writers, journalists, activists, and educators as they sought to document black women's lives. Collectively, their work established black feminism as a political practice dedicated to the equality of all people. More recently, black feminism has been deployed as a tool for theoretical and scholarly analysis that is characterized by an understanding that race, class, gender, and sexuality are inextricably interconnected. AFRC387401
LALS 395-401 Theatrical Modernity and Postmodernity in Latin America Selma Feliciano Arroyo TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN395401
LALS 396-401 Contemporary Colombian Literature: A History of Violence and Redemption Oscar E. Montoya MWF 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN390401
LALS 396-402 Animals and Animality in Latin American Literature Ashley R Brock TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN390402
LALS 397-401 Urban Life in Contemporary Latin American Literature Jean O'Bryan Knight MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN396401
LALS 397-402 Literature and Science in Latin America: Theory and Aesthetics Senen E. Carlo TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN396402
LALS 398-401 Literature and Film of the Cuban Revolution Ashley R Brock TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc CIMS397401, SPAN397401
LALS 398-402 Architecture-Lt Americn Identities: Who Am I? Who Are You? Who Are They? Linda L. Grabner Travis TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN397402
LALS 424-601 Latinx Communities and the Role of Cbo's in Social Change Johnny Irizarry T 05:30 PM-08:30 PM The purpose of this course to create a Latino Studies/Service Learning ABCS course that cultivates dialogue and knowledge about the social, political, cultural and historical complexities of the Latinx experience in the United States (Philadelphia in particular) and the roles Latinx CBO's play in meeting the needs of Latinx communities and in impacting social change. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">An Academically Based Community Serv Course</span>
LALS 431-601 People and Power in Modern Mexico Juan Manuel Lombera TR 05:30 PM-07:00 PM An introduction to social, political, and economic organization of modern Mexico. This course traces to evolution of Mexico's fundamental societal institutions from their birth during the Mexican Revolution of 1910, through their flowering during the 1950's and 1960's, to recent changes under neoliberal administrations. The course ends with a discussion of Mexico's transition to democracy and the election of the first opposition President in 80 years. HIST412601 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2018C&course=LALS431601
LALS 433-401 Andean Archaeology Clark Lowden Erickson TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Consideration of the culture history of the native peoples of the Andean area, with emphasis on the pre-conquest archaeology of the Central-Andean region. ANTH433401
LALS 437-401 Love,Anger,Madness: Love, Anger, Madness: History and Silences in Modern Haiti Grace L. Sanders Johnson R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM GSWS436401, AFRC436401, HIST436401
LALS 667-401 Latin American Art David Young Kim
Gwendolyn D Shaw
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The numerous traditions of Latin American art have been formed from the historical confluence of Indigenous, European, African, and Asian cultural traditions, each one impacting the others. This course serves as an introduction to these hybrid New World art forms and movements by both providing a large chronological sweep (1492-present) and focusing on several specific countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Peru, and Argentina. ARTH267401, ARTH667401, LALS267401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2018C&course=LALS667401
LALS 697-401 Latin American Marxisms Ericka Beckman T 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Topics vary. Please see the Spanish Department's website for the current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/hispanic-portuguese-studies/pc SPAN697401
LALS 710-401 Fascism and Racism: A Love Story Michael George Hanchard CANCELED This course provides the opportunity for students to investigate the relationship between the emergence of African peoples as historical subjects and their location within specific geopolitical and economic circumstances. Topics vary. What is the relationship between fascism an racism in modern politics, and how have black political thinkers and organizations understood this relationship? This graduate level course is designed to familiarize students with the historical and contemporary literature on fascism as a phenomena of modern politics, and the importance of racial politics and ideologies to its constitution. Students will become familiar with the contributions of Black political actors, organizations and thinkers in Europe, Africa, Asia and the New World to fascism's defeat in the 1920's and 1930's, as well as more contemporary efforts to curb more contemporary fascist movements, regimes and aesthetics in late modernity. Antonio Gramsci, Robert Paxton, Michael Mann, C.L.R. James, George Padmore, Aime Cesaire, Suzanne Cesaire and Hannah Arendt are among the thinkers, theorists and activist students will encounter in this course. The overarching aim of thiscourse is to identify fascism in both historical and contemporary contexts as avery specific form of political organization and rule, and its interrelationship with racism, nationalism and xenophobia. AFRC710401